Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Discussion of the benefits and disadvantages of commercial and homemade (DIY) liposomal vitamin C

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Montrealrr90
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Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#1  Post by Montrealrr90 » Sun Sep 20, 2015 7:53 am

I started givin 5 ML of Liposomal from absorb health to my wife and she says that it gives her energy and a clearer mind. She has always had hypoglycaemia and has complained that she got that 3 times this week. I have never heard that from lipo so just asking you if its legitimate or not ? Personally I think she eats too much sugar and has a glass of wine every night ?

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#2  Post by BrightSideOfLife » Mon Aug 29, 2016 10:42 am

I am a Type 1 Diabetic, insulin dependent. Vitamin C needs insulin for transport into cells just like glucose which is why diabetics are so prone to heart disease. Their blood glucose levels tend to be higher than normal which leaves less available insulin to transport vitamin C into cells, especially when blood glucose levels are outside the normal range as they frequently are following meals.

Vitamin C is also an antioxidant which could affect processes and potentially reduce insulin requirements.

Therefore it's a bit of a two edge sword, as it can both lower available insulin and lower insulin requirements but what the overall effect is, is very difficult to predict.

I have not personally noticed any noticeable lowering of blood glucose following taking vitamin C at 4 ml at a time. However my BG is quite unstable for other reasons so it's very difficult to judge. I don't think Vitamin C plays any effect in it though. ATM I do not use liposomal C, I have not yet found the needed equipment to make it as I have not received any information on this forum about the ultrasonic cleaners that are available to me.

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#3  Post by tjohnson_nb » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:02 pm

BrightSideOfLife wrote:Vitamin C needs insulin for transport into cells just like glucose which is why diabetics are so prone to heart disease. Their blood glucose levels tend to be higher than normal which leaves less available insulin to transport vitamin C into cells, especially when blood glucose levels are outside the normal range as they frequently are following meals.

I hear this alot, but it's DHAA, the oxidized form of AA that competes with glucose for the GLUT transporters. AA is absorbed via SVCT transporters, however probably much of the AA is converted into DHAA in the gut due to the presence of free radicals that can oxidize it so in the end it may only be a technicality. :)
'Always' and 'never' are 2 words you should always remember never to use.

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#4  Post by RatherBeUnknown » Mon Aug 29, 2016 5:09 pm

tjohnson_nb wrote:I hear this alot, but it's DHAA, the oxidized form of AA that competes with glucose for the GLUT transporters.

Could this explain why vitamin C in a liquid I leave over for a day can cause upon ingestion a faint feeling of hypo or hyperglycemia for a very short while? I'm assuming that leaving AA in a liquid for many hours causes some of it to turn into DHAA.

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#5  Post by tjohnson_nb » Tue Aug 30, 2016 10:38 am

RatherBeUnknown wrote:Could this explain why vitamin C in a liquid I leave over for a day can cause upon ingestion a faint feeling of hypo or hyperglycemia for a very short while? I'm assuming that leaving AA in a liquid for many hours causes some of it to turn into DHAA.

It depends on the purity of the water and the concentration of ascorbate. Dilute solutions with any metals in it will degrade rather quickly and reach an equilibrium in about 4 hrs. Any DHAA will rapidly degrade into by products so you won't be ingesting DHAA.
'Always' and 'never' are 2 words you should always remember never to use.

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#6  Post by RatherBeUnknown » Tue Aug 30, 2016 11:26 am

tjohnson_nb wrote:
RatherBeUnknown wrote:Could this explain why vitamin C in a liquid I leave over for a day can cause upon ingestion a faint feeling of hypo or hyperglycemia for a very short while? I'm assuming that leaving AA in a liquid for many hours causes some of it to turn into DHAA.

It depends on the purity of the water and the concentration of ascorbate. Dilute solutions with any metals in it will degrade rather quickly and reach an equilibrium in about 4 hrs. Any DHAA will rapidly degrade into by products so you won't be ingesting DHAA.

Am I correct in thinking then that leaving vitamin C in a liquid for a day (i.e. mixing in juice day 1, drinking day 2) does degrade it since even the DHAA metabolite quickly degrades?

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Re: Hypoglycaemia and Liposomal

Post Number:#7  Post by tjohnson_nb » Tue Aug 30, 2016 3:08 pm

Yes, the way I understand it is that DHAA is very unstable in solution and rapidly decomposes into other chemicals. So that ascorbate is lost and to offset this you could use more ascorbate than you want to slow down degradation and end up with more usable ascorbate.
'Always' and 'never' are 2 words you should always remember never to use.


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