David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Ask questions, seek advice, or share your experience with vitamin C

Moderators: ofonorow, popnowlin

ofonorow
Ascorbate Wizard
Ascorbate Wizard
Posts: 12879
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:16 pm
Location: Lisle, IL
Contact:

David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Post Number:#1  Post by ofonorow » Thu May 31, 2018 10:25 am

Instead of opting for supplements, Jenkins, a Canada Research Chair and professor at the Department of Nutritional Sciences at University of Toronto, advises people to consume needed nutrients through "a more plant-based diet of less processed food."


http://stmichaelshospitalresearch.ca/researchers/david-jenkins/I

Looks like he is more a registered dietitian than a micronutrionist.
Owen R. Fonorow, Follow #OWENRFONOROW at twitter

pamojja
Vitamin C Expert
Vitamin C Expert
Posts: 796
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2009 7:44 am
Contact:

Re: David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Post Number:#2  Post by pamojja » Thu May 31, 2018 11:52 am

This work was supported by the Canada Research Chair Endorsement, Loblaw Cos. Ltd., and the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR). Dr. Jenkins is funded by the government of Canada through the Canada Research Chair Endowment; has received research grants from Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, the Agricultural Bioproducts Innovation Program through the Pulse Research Network, the Advanced Foods and Material Network (Loblaw Companies Ltd.), Unilever, Barilla, the Almond Board of California, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Pulse Canada, Kellogg's Company, Quaker Oats, Procter & Gamble Technical Centre Ltd., Bayer Consumer Care, Pepsi/Quaker, International Nut & Dried Fruit (INC), Soy Foods Association of North America, the Coca-Cola Company (investigator-initiated, unrestricted grant), Solae, Haine Celestial, the Sanitarium Company, Orafti, the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation, the Peanut Institute, the Canola and Flax Councils of Canada, the Calorie Control Council, the CIHR, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the Ontario Research Fund; has received in-kind supplies for trials as a research support from the Almond Board of California, Walnut Council of California, American Peanut Council, Barilla, Unilever, Unico, Primo, Loblaw Companies, Quaker (Pepsico), Pristine Gourmet, Bunge Limited, Kellogg Canada, and WhiteWave Foods; has been on the speakers panel, served on the scientific advisory board, and/or received travel support and/or honoraria from the Almond Board of California, Canadian Agriculture Policy Institute, Loblaw Companies Ltd., the Griffin Hospital (for the development of the NuVal scoring system), the Coca-Cola Company, EPICURE, Danone, Diet Quality Photo Navigation, Better Therapeutics (FareWell), Verywell, True Health Initiative, Institute of Food Technologists, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, Sanitarium Company, Orafti, the American Peanut Council, the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation, the Peanut Institute, Herbalife International, Pacific Health Laboratories, Nutritional Fundamental for Health, Barilla, Metagenics, Bayer Consumer Care, Unilever Canada and Netherlands, Solae, Kellogg, Quaker Oats, Procter & Gamble, the Coca-Cola Company, the Griffin Hospital, Abbott Laboratories, the Canola Council of Canada, Dean Foods, the California Strawberry Commission, Haine Celestial, PepsiCo, the Alpro Foundation, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, DuPont Nutrition and Health, Spherix Consulting and WhiteWave Foods, the Advanced Foods and Material Network, the Canola and Flax Councils of Canada, the Nutritional Fundamentals for Health, Agri-Culture and Agri-Food Canada, the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute, Pulse Canada, the Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, the Soy Foods Association of North America, the Nutrition Foundation of Italy, Nutra-Source Diagnostics, the McDougall Program, the Toronto Knowledge Translation Group (St. Michael's Hospital), the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, the Canadian Nutrition Society (CNS), the American Society of Nutrition (ASN), Arizona State University, Paolo Sorbini Foundation, and the Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes; has received an honorarium from the United States Department of Agriculture to present the 2013 W.O. Atwater Memorial Lecture; has received funding and travel support from the Canadian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism to produce mini-cases for the Canadian Diabetes Association; is a member of the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium (ICQC); his wife is a director and partner of Glycemic Index Laboratories, Inc.; and his sister received funding through a grant from the St. Michael's Hospital Foundation to develop a cookbook for one of his studies. Dr. Spence is an officer of Vascularis, Inc.; and has received lecture fee from Bristol-Myers Squibb. Dr. Kendall has received grants or research support from the Advanced Food Materials Network, Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada, Almond Board of California, American Pistachio Growers, Barilla, Calorie Control Council, CIHR, Canola Council of Canada, International Nut and Dried Fruit Council, International Tree Nut Council Research and Education Foundation, Loblaw Brands Ltd., Pulse Canada, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, and Unilever; has received in-kind research support from the Almond Board of California, American Peanut Council, Barilla, California Walnut Commission, Kellogg Canada, Loblaw Companies, Quaker (Pepsico), Primo, Unico, Unilever, and WhiteWave Foods; has received travel support and/or honoraria from the American Peanut Council, American Pistachio Growers, Barilla, California Walnut Commission, Canola Council of Canada, General Mills, International Nut and Dried Fruit Council, International Pasta Organization, Loblaw Brands Ltd., Nutrition Foundation of Italy, Oldways Preservation Trust, Paramount Farms, Peanut Institute, Pulse Canada, Sabra Dipping Co., Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, Sun-Maid, Tate & Lyle, Unilever, and White Wave Foods; has served on the scientific advisory board for the International Tree Nut Council, International Pasta Organization, McCormick Science Institute, Oldways Preservation Trust, Paramount Farms, and Pulse Canada; and is a member of the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium (ICQC), an executive board member of the Diabetes and Nutrition Study Group (DNSG) of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), is on the Clinical Practice Guidelines Expert Committee for Nutrition Therapy of the EASD, and is a director of the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Foundation. Dr. Sievenpiper has received research support from the CIHR, Diabetes Canada, PSI Foundation, Banting and Best Diabetes Centre (BBDC), CNS, ASN, Calorie Control Council, INC, National Dried Fruit Trade Association, The Tate and Lyle Nutritional Research Fund at the University of Toronto, and the Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Fund at the University of Toronto (a fund established by the Alberta Pulse Growers); has received in-kind research support from the Almond Board of California, California Walnut Commission, American Peanut Council, Barilla, Unilever, Unico, Primo, Loblaw Companies, Quaker (Pepsico), Kellogg Canada, and WhiteWave Foods; has received travel support, speaker fees, and/or honoraria from Diabetes Canada, CNS, Mott’s LLP, Dairy Farmers of Canada, Sprim Brasil, WhiteWave Foods, Rippe Lifestyle, mdBriefcase, Alberta Milk, FoodMinds LLC, Memac Ogilvy & Mather LLC, PepsiCo, The Ginger Network LLC, International Sweeteners Association, Nestlé Nutrition Institute, Pulse Canada, Canadian Society for Endocrinology and Metabolism, Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition Foundation, and the GI Foundation; has ad hoc consulting arrangements with Winston & Strawn LLP, Perkins Coie LLP, and Tate & Lyle; is a member of the European Fruit Juice Association Scientific Expert Panel; is a member of the Clinical Practice Guidelines Expert Committees of Diabetes Canada, EASD, Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and the Canadian Obesity Network; serves as an unpaid scientific advisor for the Food, Nutrition, and Safety Program and the Technical Committee on Carbohydrates of the International Life Science Institute North America; is a member of the ICQC, Executive Board Member of the DNSG of the EASD, and Director of the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Foundation; and his wife is an employee of Unilever Canada. All other authors have reported that they have no relationships relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.


http://orthomolecular.acemlnb.com/lt.ph ... A97A1A4356

ofonorow
Ascorbate Wizard
Ascorbate Wizard
Posts: 12879
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:16 pm
Location: Lisle, IL
Contact:

Re: David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Post Number:#3  Post by ofonorow » Thu May 31, 2018 1:38 pm

Thank you pamojja!
If you can find the link to the actual study, that would be helpful.

Also, here is virginia company that seems to be one person - a David Jenkins.
http://www.vamedresearch.com/home.html
It would be very interesting if this was the one and the same David Jenkins. Here are entities this David Jenkin's serves



National Institutes of Health
Centers for Disease Control And Prevention
Merck 8 Co.
Siemens Diagnostics
Cedars Sinai Medical Center
Trinity Biotech
Pfizer
Abbott
Owen R. Fonorow, Follow #OWENRFONOROW at twitter

pamojja
Vitamin C Expert
Vitamin C Expert
Posts: 796
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2009 7:44 am
Contact:

Re: David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Post Number:#4  Post by pamojja » Thu May 31, 2018 2:20 pm

ofonorow wrote:Thank you pamojja!
If you can find the link to the actual study, that would be helpful.


There is a link to it at the end of the original orthomolecular medicine news service article by Andrew Saul:

http://orthomolecular.activehosted.com/index.php?action=social&chash=98dce83da57b0395e163467c9dae521b.97&s=7c74ea4142654ab8354fadc2af4bc0ee

(from where I copied all the financial ties). Interestingly, just now this seem to have become a death link. Must have too many visitors getting there from OMNS.

ofonorow
Ascorbate Wizard
Ascorbate Wizard
Posts: 12879
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:16 pm
Location: Lisle, IL
Contact:

Re: David Jenkins Lead Author in "Huge" Anti-Vitamin Study - Biased?

Post Number:#5  Post by ofonorow » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:35 am

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0735109718345601

First, how many studies to meta analyze the used Pauling's recommended dosages of vitamin C? Probably zero. We agree, too small dosages are not effective for Cardiovascular disease.

Despite high supplement use by the general public, there is no general agreement on whether individual vitamins and minerals or their combinations should be taken as supplements for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention or treatment.


What is generally recommended internationally is consumption of a good diet as part of a healthy lifestyle. The recent science-based report of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, also concerned with CVD risk reduction, recommended 3 dietary patterns: 1) a healthy American diet low in saturated fat, trans fat, and red meat, but high in fruit and vegetables; 2) a Mediterranean diet; and 3) a vegetarian diet (5). These diets, with their accompanying recommendations, continue the move toward more plant-based diets that are relatively rich in vitamins and minerals, which liberally satisfies requirements (Dietary Reference Intakes) but which are still below the tolerable upper levels of intake of the recommended range in which adverse effects may be seen. Thus, for the general public, the focus has been on meeting requirements through diet, rather than supplements.


And what do we know? Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and Strokes are still the number one killer in the USA. These recommendations aren't doing much good.

Therefore, we reviewed the evidence for supplement use over the last 4 years since the publication of the evidence (6) and guidelines (7) for supplement use of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).


Why only look at the past 4 years?

What defines a "high quality evidence" study? (If number of participants defines "quality", we learn from Hickey/Roberts in Tarnished Gold that large effects do not require a large number of participants to detect them. Medicine routinely uses large population studies because the effects are usually small.


Of the 4 most commonly used supplements (multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C), none had a significant effect on cardiovascular outcomes. The summary plots are shown in Figure 2. Furthermore, none had an effect on all-cause mortality (Figure 2).


These meta analyses also seem to hide the dosages, whether the vitamin levels were measured in the blood or assessed via food questionnaires, etc. Post #7 in this topic reviews the vitamin C studies that measured blood levels http://www.vitaminc.foundation/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=13906&p=52707#p52707 and found DECREASE mortality. Seems like a contradiction.

DISCUSSION

In general, the data on the popular supplements (multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C) show no consistent benefit for the prevention of CVD, MI, or stroke, nor was there a benefit for all-cause mortality to support their continued use
.

Quite a statement. Thanks to Linus Pauling, we have been monitoring people cured of their CVD since 1996 using orthomolecular doses of vitamin C (and lysine), See: https://vitaminccures.com/blog/index.php/heart-disease-testimonials/ . Yet these "Meta Study" authors trust their software so much as to recommend that multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium and vitamin C be "discontinued." (Wouldn't that advice be windfall for medicine and Big Pharma?)

Review

Blood studies show that vitamins C and K DECREASE mortality. This meta analysis of the past 4 years found no study that supported the earlier findings.

Vitamin D has not been a target of the propaganda campaign originally (My speculation is this was because Pauling didn't recommend it) and the research on vitamin D exploded. Now the campaign is trying to catch up for lost time.

Doctors have little time for outside research, and tend to get their "news" like this from their trusted journals.

We don't need a meta study to learn that low doses of vitamin C do not work treating and seemingly curing cardio vascular disease. Large doses generally produce a large effect that any CVD patient can experience for themselves. The more pain and difficulty walking, the more profound the effect will be. See http://Paulingtherapy.com for the introduction
Owen R. Fonorow, Follow #OWENRFONOROW at twitter


Return to “General Discussion Topics and Issues”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests